COPE STREET

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15th April 2016

Memories of Leon Jones

Me, my sisters lived in Fulmer walk cope street for over 40 years.

 

I remember the health centre used to be a car showroom and a garage underneath and also used to be large grass verge where we used to play football and cricket. I also remember the washing area that had sheds there too.

 

 

25th March 2016

Memories of Albert Moulsdale

Hi Mac,

 

Thought it was about time I put my memories down for the website.

 

I was born in 1947 and lived in Cope Street up until 1963. At first we lived at no 23, a front house which opened straight out onto the street, midway between Springfield Street and Stour Street. In the photo it is the house directly behind the little girl on the left. This had one downstairs room, one bedroom and an attic. This was home to Mom & Dad (Pru and Albert) and us six kids, Valerie, Lynda, Me (The first photo), John, Angela and Elaine (Youngest brother Alan came later). Our “view” from the house was the big, dark, railway wall in the other photo.

 

Valerie, Albert and Lynda

View from the house

This was taken in "the yard" of Mr. Jenks, son Johnny, daughter Gina on the left and Gina's friend with the fair hair

This photograph shows the house that Albert and

his family lived in Cope Street

 

Mary Beers article brought back memories of names forgotten, Kath and Wal at the corner shop. I remember them as very obliging, friendly people. I remember Cyril’s Mom but only after she became a widow. 

 

Early memories of childhood in our yard include bonfire night (I sent in a picture by Betty Attwood previously), “hiding” on the lavatory roof and frightening whoever was in the loo, playing football and cricket and trying to avoid hitting the washing or anyone’s windows with the ball.  My friends in the yard were Terry Gardner, Billy Behan, Johnny (Mixer) and David Jenks.  Between us we actually “invented” the skateboard.  We took apart a roller skate (the metal ones you strapped to the bottom of your shoes), fastened the two sets of wheels to a piece of wood and rolled down the hill on it. I will admit we only sat on it.  Not quite brave enough to stand up, as I recall.  Terry and I used to have running races around the block.  We were always competing to see who could run the fastest. We used to run in opposite directions, to make it interesting. One would go up, Cope Street, along Springfield Street, down King Edwards Road and back along Stour Street and the other went the opposite way.  First back to the lamppost won.

 

In Cyril Beers article he mentioned “The Stag”. This was a pub at no. 21 many years ago. In the photo it is the property with the arched doorway and a modified bay window on the left.  On the electoral list in Mary’s article, there are two families at no.21.  That’s because the Stag had been converted into two, three bed-roomed properties.  In 1961 we moved into half of no 21 opposite the Greed family.  Shortly after moving our “baby” brother Alan was born.  Although we had an extra bedroom, there were still no such luxuries as heating, running hot water or a bathroom. We still had an outside toilet and we still had to go to Monument road washing baths where our neighbour Mr Butcher worked.  He would run the water into the bath then call you when it was ready.  Problem was it was so hot you couldn’t get in.  He wouldn’t come and add any cold water!  Consequently, by the time you could get in he was banging the door to tell you your time was up?

 

Along with many of the lads at the time, I joined the 36th company of the BB at Summerhill Methodist Church on Monument Road.  The BB was a great grounding for many lads in the neighbourhood. The highlight of the year was the two weeks’ annual summer camping trip. The only chance many of us had for a holiday.

 

Two years ago I had an amazing coincidence.  Whilst on holiday in Albufeira, Portugal, I happened to meet the aforementioned Johnny (Mixer) Jenks. We had not met since 1962 when his family left the area. We had a great time together and have remained in touch since then. I am enclosing one of his photos taken in “our yard”.  It is of Mr Jenks, son Johnny, daughter Gina on the left, and a friend of Gina’s with the fair hair. Behind them is one of the “posher” brewhouses (it was kept locked)!  The house behind, with the milk bottles on window sill, never had electricity installed!  The occupants of that house were old Mr and Mrs Spriggs, their adult daughter, Amy McGee, and her three daughters and son Johnny. All in one room downstairs, one bedroom and one attic??  They had gas lighting and cooking until the day they moved out.

 

I know many people talk of the “good old days” but really, who would want to return to the way we had to live?  Not me.  I do think it would have been nice to take our daughters or grandchildren to see where we grew up.  I know the area is still there but the only remaining buildings are the library, the “welfare” and St Johns Church.

 

I will close there, as there is so much one could write, I could write a book!

 

 

This is from the 1955-1956 Register of Electors

 

 

 

 

 

 

16th February 2016

Memories of Mary Beer

My name is Mary Beer and I lived with my husband, Cyril, and his family at 25 Cope Street from 1955 when we were first married, to 1960.

 

Sadly Cyril passed away in June 2014 just after posting his memories on this site, so I was pleased to read John Bushell's article - who was related to Cyril - he was our page boy and his sister, Pat, was bridesmaid.

 

I also remember the family who ran the corner shop was Kath an Wal - they had a baby daughter called Sharon. Also, Pru and Albert Mousdale who lived at no. 23 with their family, and Alfie Butcher lived next door at No. 24.

 

Aunt Edie and Uncle Bill lived at the top of Cope Street next door to Jack and Lil Bushell.

 

I know Cyril would have been delighted to read the latest article from John Bushell, and I would be pleased to hear from anyone who remembers me or Cyril and his parents Rose and Charlie Beer and his sister Bet and her husband Ernie (who sadly passed away in 1991 and Ernie in 2011).

 

This is from the 1955-1956 Register of Electors

 

 

3rd December 2015

Memories of Angela Moulsdale

Would love to hear from anyone who lived in Cope Street, sadly mom and dad (Albert and Prue) are no longer with us, also we lost our big sister Val earlier this year.

 

Mom and dad’s name was Moulsdale and we lived at 23 and 21 Cope Street

 

 

Thanks

Angela

 

 

23rd November 2015

Memories of John Bushell

I was born in the house at 8 Cope Street in 1950.

 

My dad was Jack, mom Lil, sister Patty, Nan and Grandad lived next door next to the entry.

 

I went to Steward Street School then to Barford Road. We moved to Quinton in the sixties due to demolishing the area and I left school at 15 and went back to Cope Street to work at Frank Moseley's as an apprentice mechanic.

 

I was in the Lifeboys where Charlie walker was in charge, I then went into the 36 Boys Brigade. I went to camp at Tenby and Cricket. I also joined Ladywood Boxing Club where Frank Sullivan, Pat Benson and Paddy Lynch trained us when I was around 10. I went with Charlie Sharp to Rhyl in Beattie and Len Phillips caravan, they ran the Crown pub in Cope Street.

 

My uncle Cyril wrote a story in this column about my dad Jack, who had a fight with the Italian prisoners of war and also about his war career which he never talked about, I know he was injured and a prisoner of war.

 

My Nan, Eadie Bushell nee Pitt with my sister Patty, me and my Granddad Billy Bushell outside their house in Cope Street

 

John aged about 11 or 12 years old

My dad Jack about 17 years ago

Me and my dad in 1999 at The Walkabout on Broad Street

 

 

My Nan and Granddad, Eadie and Jack

 

My Dad's school certificate which says he was Midland Counties Champion at the age of 14

Cal Barton (left) a professional boxer who lived in Cope Street

 

 

 

10th November 2015

Memories of John Bushell

I was born in the house at 8 Cope Street in 1950.

 

My dad was Jack, mom Lil, sister Patty, Nan and Grandad lived next door next to the entry.

I went to Steward Street School then to Barford Road. We moved to Quinton in the sixties due to demolishing the area and I left school at 15 and went back to Cope Street to work at Frank Moseley's as an apprentice mechanic.

 

I was in the Lifeboys where Charlie walker was in charge, I then went into the 36 Boys Brigade. I went to camp at Tenby and Cricket. I also joined Ladywood Boxing Club where Frank Sullivan, Pat Benson and Paddy Lynch trained us when I was around 10. I went with Charlie Sharp to Rhyl in Beattie and Len Phillips caravan, they ran the Crown pub in Cope Street.

 

My uncle Cyril wrote a story in this column about my dad Jack, who had a fight with the Italian prisoners of war and also about his war career which he never talked about, I know he was injured and a prisoner of war.

 

 

29th April 2014

Memories of Cyril Beer

My name is Cyril Beer and I was born and bred in Cope Street during the 1930's.

 

There was a shop it was Dolly Glases shop.  Then there was the Crown Pub run by Len and Beat Philips.  One thing I will always remember is a stuffed pike weighing 40 lbs in a glass case.  Then across the road on the corner of Springfield Street was a house which was once a fish and chip shop - I think a family named Bryant owned it but he was also a coal merchant - then going down Cope Street was Smiths a little shop.  Next to that was a family named Grinsalls - next to them was Allports, then Bill and Jess Harris and their son Billy.  Next to them was Bill Sanders his wife and two daughters.  Then The Stag - I don't remember the names of the people in the other houses until The Butchers.

 

I don't know if you remember what we called a double knack where you could go down the entry by Butchers in Cope Street and come out in Stour Street.  Well, one year my mom and dad had bought me a case ball for my birthday and I was playing with Alfie Butcher heading the ball between the lamp posts on the other side of the road when I happened to look down the road and there was a copper standing on the corner.  We did no more than dash down the entry and hid in our toilet.  I stood on the seat and looked through the air bricks in the wall and sure enough the policeman was coming down the entry looking for us.  There was a lady cleaning her windows and the policeman asked her if she had seen us - the lady's name was Winnie Arnold and she said she hadn't seen us but it was a double knack and came out in Stour Street so off he went looking for us- I think we hid in the toilet for about an hour before we came out. 

 

Opposite Dolly Glase's shop was Powell's the wood yard on the side of the railway.  Horse and carts used to loaded or unloaded with wood for delivery.  One day either unloading or loading the cart, a train shunting carriages blew its whistle.  It frightened the horse and off it went down Cope Street, cart and the lot!!  It bolted down Cope Street and tried to turn into Stour Street and finished half in and half out of Glasbrook's house.  It was a sad day as they had to shoot the horse.  Also, during the war, they used to bring Italian POW's to clean out the carriages.  They used to come by coach and have the run of the town.  They really had it easy.  It was different for our Jack.  He was wounded in North Africa in Monty's Eighth Army - then he was in the battle of Mount Casino and moved on and crossed The Rhine.  He was then taken prisoner. He was at Stalag 7a Munich for the rest of the war.

 

I thought you might like to share some of my memories!

 

I wonder if anyone remembers a fight with the prisoners of war and my cousin Jack?

 

24th March 2014

Memories of Cyril Beer

My name is Cyril Beer and I was born and bred in Cope Street during the 1930's.

 

I noticed a school photograph on your website which was taken around 1935 and my sister, Betty Beer, was on the photograph.

 

She is sitting next to the Lady School Teacher.

 

I also recognised many old faces such as Basil Pitt (my cousin), Dennis Hubble, Jean Price, Betty Brookes, Tommy Adams, Alan Rose, and a few more.

 

Dennis and I were great friends and we played football together for Stour Rangers and we won the league one year. But since I was two years younger than Dennis, conscription called Dennis for two years and when he was de-mobbed I was called up.

 

So, after those four years we lost touch. 

 

There's a photograph of the medal presentation at The West End in Birmingham but I wasn't on because I was away in the Army.

 

I would be very pleased to hear from any of those people or anyone else who might remember me.  We lived at 25 Cope Street next door to the corner shop.  Mr Saunders was shop keeper.  Mr Saunders's son and his family lived a few doors away from us.

 

9th November 2013  

Photographs courtesy of Trevor Williams

In the Crown Public House

Back tow: Len Clarke, Charlie Clarke, Walter Clarke (father), Ernie Clarke

Dad and son's out for a lunchtime drink, 1960's

Trevor Williams, age 3 with uncle Bert holding his hand

Bert's brothers on end of line right: Ernie Clarke and left: Len Clarke

Outside the Crown Public House

 

17th September 2012

Photographs courtesy of Dorothy Carr, nee Osborne

Little boy, Robert at 4 back of 6 Cope Street

Dorothy at 6 back of 8 Cope Street, 1964

 

Party in Cope Street

Party in Cope Street

 

Party in Cope Street

Smith's shop in Cope Street

 

10th January 2010

Powell's timber yard in Cope Street

Coach Trip from Cope Street

Crown Inn corner of Springfield Street and Cope Street 1964

Looking down Cope Street

Britachrom Ltd., 1959

Looking from Monument Road down Cope Street 1969

Corner of Monument Road and Cope Street with the Station Public House

5-14 Cope Street, 1964

Cope Street corner of Steward Street

15-41 Cope Street, 1964

Cope Street, 1964

Cope Street, 2000

 

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